Silver Caddy Spoons

Silver Caddy Spoons offered for sale with free UK postage. Please click any link below to browse item of choice
Silver Caddy Spoons
Antique silver caddy spoon 
London 1857
Samuel Hayne and Dudley Cater
Price £148
Silver Caddy Spoons
Antique silver caddy spoon 
Birmingham 1866
George Unite
Price £135

Silver Caddy Spoons
Silver caddy spoon 
Sheffield 1915
W S Savage & Co
Price £96
Silver Caddy Spoons
Silver shell shape caddy spoon 
London 1971
C J Vander Ltd
Price £65
Silver Caddy Spoons
Silver Caddy Spoon 
Birmingham 1970
J B Chatterley & Sons Ltd
Price £65

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

sold

Eagles Wing Caddy Spoon London 1971 CJ Vander Ltd Price £495

Antique silver caddy spoon London 1863 Holland Aldwinckle & Slater Price £99

Antique victorian silver large caddy spoon  London 1897 Charles Boyton Price £58

Antique silver caddy spoon Birmingham 1827 Joseph Willmore Price £103

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Types of Caddy Spoons that can be collected
The Eagles wing

This rare and elegant design was created by Joseph Wilmore in Birmingham in 1814. A similar pattern was produced by Matthew Linwood in Birmingham a couple of years later. The Eagles wing consist of a bowl with overlapping feathers and a matching handle terminating in the head and beak. This design is rare and although copied by other silversmiths an early example will be quite coveted. This spoon style has been adopted by the Society of Cady spoon Collectors.

The Hand

The hand shape caddy spoon is thought to have gained popularity in the early 1800’s with peak manufacturing around 1805. Its popularity is linked to the naval history of that time where raising a hand as a salute gesture was socially popular. There was much naval activity at this time with Lord Nelson and many famous battles such as Trafalgar. The most prolific maker of this shape of spoon was Josiah Snatt. The design was quickly copied by other makers. Interestingly a survey in 1964 by the Society of Caddy Spoon Collectors found members who replied owned 53 specimens. Of these only one was left handed and no less than 39 were made by Josiah Snatt a London silversmith.

The Jockey Cap

Very appealing and distinctive jockey cap spoons are very popular but not so rare. Again reflecting social activity of the time a gentleman’s pursuit of hunting and fishing and especially horse racing and gambling were clear winners in producing a commercially marketable shaped spoon. Fashion over the years has led to peaks and troughs in production and the shape is still manufactured today. Collectors will favour the silversmith Joseph Taylor who in 1797 is credited with producing the first jockey cap caddy spoon. Caution with these spoons is necessary as they were the subject of fakes as it was easy to create a cap peak from another older piece of silver and pass it off as an original.

The Acorn

The oak tree is strongly entrenched in English history. The ships of the Royal Navy were built of it. Our trade at various time relied upon these sturdy vessels.” Heart of Oak” had a very real meaning. It is no surprise that the oak leaf and acorn too should be a symbol. It is thought the acorn first originated in the workshops of Samuel Pemberton a Birmingham maker.

The Scallop

Perhaps the classic caddy spoon shape which in no small way gave its design to the first sea shells which were found in tea chests arriving in this countryfrom the Far East. Of these sea shells the scallop shell was by far the most practical to use as a scoop to ladle tea. This shape became popular and was also seen in butter and serving dishes. Many modern reproduction spoons mimic the shape with a shell bowl and traditional handle bearing a shell embossing.

The Miniature

The dedicated collector will no doubt find miniature caddy spoons in the majority of patterns made. These have an interesting history. Whilst many were clearly made as toys to adorn dolls houses, others had a commercial purpose as a “sample” to display to potential customers. There are also early travelling sets where the wealthy of the period used to carry with them all that was necessary to sustain them on a journey. Minatare corkscrews, tumblers and caddy spoons are not unusual.

There are of course many more styles to be collected than just those recounted above. Art Deco and Art Noveau all styles can be seem in the more recent caddy spoon. Commemorative collectors will find caddy spoons cast to mark special Royal events.

As a final note do not neglect the modern caddy spoon. Today’s silversmith is producing the antique collectors item of future generations now, it is worth while seeking them out and even commissioning your own special spoon.

I hope this guide is useful in some small way and good luck with your collecting

Silver Caddy Spoons For Sale